Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Kindergarten Cops

When I was in kindergarten, I absolutely loved when my teacher provided me with a clear, descriptive rubric aligned to Common Core Learning Standards with every assignment. If you think I'm joking, it's because I am. CCLS didn't exist when I was in Kindergarten. I remember playing with Legos, building toy railroad circuits, drawing and pretending to be Superman, and of course, crying for my mother. And I'm pretty sure my Kindergarten teacher wasn't using a rubric to assess the rigor of my sobbing.

"There is no bathroom!"
Recently, an article from the Atlantic has been making its rounds with educators on social media. In short, the article juxtaposes America's strict, academic "reform" approach with Finland's "let kids play and figure it out" approach to kindergarten. It's an insightful case study of two well-intentioned, yet very different schools of thought in public education. 

Any time a concerned American suggests we take lessons on education policy from Scandinavian countries, they're often blitzed with negativity. "It's a small, homogenous country." "They've never had to deal with our kind of immigration." "That's nice, but they're all white." Some of these criticisms may be valid, but they're not solutions-oriented. They're just statements that make excuses for our own lack of excellence in schools.

Obviously, we're not Finland. But, we can still learn and adopt some of its best practices for our own needs. Or are we just too damn proud? In this standard Finland vs. America argument on education, we tend to ignore Finland's neighbor, Norway. Finland is nearly as populous as Norway (and nearly the same square mileage). Both countries have a comparable labor force and both countries have similar immigration levels. However, Norway tends to score closer to the U.S. on the PISA, which is significantly lower than Finland. Norway's teachers don't need a masters degree, and yet there's a national teacher shortage prompting ad campaigns to attract young professionals to teaching - sound familiar? Back in the early 2000s, Norway instituted a national system of standardized testing (called the NKVS). Again, sound familiar?

I don't know about you (yes, you), but things haven't really changed for me: I like to play. As a child, I loved to play. If I learned from playing, then that's just awesomesauce. As a teacher, some of my most memorable "teacher moments" occurred when I purposefully built for play in my classroom. Yet, it was significantly hard to create the conditions necessary for play teaching high school mathematics. There was a constant nag in my head reminding me my students just had to pass the New York State Algebra 1 Regents exam. Otherwise, we'd both be judged as failures.

Holy rigor, Batman!
Working in education technology today, I'm even more passionate about play in school, but that's also because I'm further removed from the classroom and the daily struggle to balance rigor, engagement, and fun. The thing is, we have to draw a line somewhere. I can't imagine how much more anxiety I would have if play did not exist when I was in kindergarten. I can't imagine how much more grade-driven I would be if my teachers used CCLS-aligned rubrics while I ran around making fart sounds and holding spaceships I made from Legos. Play time at home wasn't exactly reliable because I grew up in a broken home, so I had to make the most out of any fun I could get.

There is no evidence to support that children cannot learn from play or learn and play simultaneously. A former student of mine used to tell me about how he already knew so much about the Crusades because of Assassin's Creed. Sure, it's a video game, so there are inaccuracies. In the classroom, those are called "teachable moments" (take note, those of you who have never taught). These "teachable moments" are opportunities to foster authentic discussion. It's possible to have both. But I'm getting ahead of myself. What I'm really trying to say is children need and benefit from play. We know this. If we're going to insert literacy skills into kindergarten, it should be a data-driven decision, as in it's backed by strong evidence. However, the data seems to support Finland's approach. Why are we so stubborn with this? Let's stop underestimating children. Bring back the crayons, the Lincoln Logs, and the Play-Doh please.